Country

Russia

25 trigon movies
Order by Year Title Director
Anna Karenina (Vronsky's Story) (Flyer)

Anna Karenina (Vronsky's Story)

Karen Schachnasarow - Shakhnazarov – 2017

Which should take precedence - passion or duty? How do we choose? And who gets to judge? These are eternal questions, remorselessly thrust upon us by life. Anna Karenina made her choice, leaving her son Sergei to grow up struggling to understand why his mother took such a tragic and terrible path, and Count Vronsky haunted by the memory of the woman for whose death he still blames himself 30 years later. More

Star (Flyer)

Star

Anna Melikian – 2014

A young debuting actress dreams of being a famous star admired by everybody. She lacks talent so she's planning to have plastic surgery to help her succeed. She is always an optimist, with an infectiously carefree attitude and joie de vivre. The extremely sensitive 15-year-old boy feeling at odds with the world is her opposite. He is misunderstood by his father and his stepmother, a worldly and haughty woman who is capable of true feelings only on the verge of death. More

Durak (Flyer)

Durak

Juri Bykow – 2014

Dima Nikitin is a simple and honest plumber who works in a small Russian town. Except for his unusual integrity, nothing makes him stand out of the crowd, until one night in a dorm mainly occupied by drunkards and outcasts, the pipes burst, endangering the occupants. Everybody needs to be immediately evacuated but nobody cares, so Nikitin sets off on a night-long odyssey to fight an entire system of corrupt bureaucrats. More

Silent Souls - Ovsyanki (Flyer)

Silent Souls - Ovsyanki

Aleksei Fedorchenko – 2010

When Miron’s beloved wife Tanya passes away, he asks his best friend Aist to help him say goodbye to her according to the rituals of the Merja culture, an ancient Finno-Ugric tribe from Lake Nero, a picturesque region in West-Central Russia. Although the Merja people assimilated into Russians in the 17th century, their myths and traditions live on in their descendants’ modern life. The two men set out on a roadtrip thousands of miles across the boundlesslands. With them, two small birds in a cage. More

Rusalka - Mermaid (Flyer)

Rusalka - Mermaid

Anna Melikian – 2008

Once upon a time … is the best way to tell the incredible story of the adventures of the ‘mermaid’ Alisa in the Russian capital Moscow. There was a time when Alisa lived by the sea. Her life was nothing out of the ordinary. She dreamed of one day dancing in a ballet; she sang in a children’s choir and attended a special school, because, at the age of six, she suddenly stopped speaking. None of which would be noteworthy, were it not for the fact that Alisa possessed a remarkable gift: the ability to fulfil wishes. More

Ejforija - Euphoria (Flyer)

Ejforija - Euphoria

Ivan Vyrypaev – 2006

In an amazingly beautiful place, on the bank of the wide Don, in a remote, half-destroyed village, surrounded by only steppe for hundreds of miles, a real drama takes place. An unexpected passionate love between a young man and a married woman literally destroys the lives of not only the main characters, but also their close ones. More

Russkij kovcheg - Russian Ark (Flyer)

Russkij kovcheg - Russian Ark

Alexander Sokurow – 2002

A film shot in on shot with no break. On a winter's day, a small party of men and women arrive by horse-drawn carriage to a minor, side entrance of the Winter Palace. The narrator meets another spectral but visible outsider, "the European", and follows him through numerous rooms of the palace. Each room manifests a different period of Russian history, but the periods are not in chronological order. More

Soleil trompeur - Utomlyonnye solntsem (Flyer)
Gorod Zero (Flyer)

Gorod Zero

Karen Schachnasarow - Shakhnazarov – 1989

Karen Shakhnazarov, the director of Anna Karenina (2017) belonged to the young talents of the cinema of change in the former Soviet Union during the 1980's. The comedy Gorod Zero (Zerograd) is one of the best examples of those years. The film is refreshing in that it thinks through the absurdities of the Soviet everyday life and it shows that the path that was called perestroika back then, has to be a long one. More

Offret (Flyer)

Offret

Andrei Tarkowski – 1986

In Offret, the last film by Soviet director Andrei Tarkovsky, an apocalyptic catastrophe breaks out over an actor's birthday party. Former actor Alexander (Erland Josephson) celebrates his birthday with his family and some friends in his house on the coast. It's a beautiful day until the radio announces a catastrophe that threatens the whole world. In order to keep everything as it was the day before, Alexander wants to make a sacrifice, but will that help? More

Stalker (Flyer)

Stalker

Andrei Tarkowski – 1979

In an undetermined country where desolation reigns, the Zone is a mysterious and dangerous region, where only the Stalkers, smugglers, dare to venture. One of them tries to take a writer and a scientist inside this Zone, to a room where their dearest desires can be fulfilled... After Solaris, Andreï Tarkovski returns to science fiction to illustrate a world that no longer has faith in anything. He signs a timeless masterpiece with inexhaustible potential. More

Der Spiegel - Zerkalo (Flyer)

Der Spiegel - Zerkalo

Andrei Tarkowski – 1975

Alyosha, a 40-year-old filmmaker, falls seriously ill. He remembers his past and collects the memories that marked his life: the house of his childhood, his mother waiting for the improbable return of her husband, the poems of his father, his wife and his son that he has not seen for a long time, the tumult of the Second World War... More

Solaris (Flyer)

Solaris

Andrei Tarkowski – 1972

Solaris is a 1972 Soviet science fiction film, co-written and directed by the Russian filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky. It's a meditative psychological drama occurring mostly aboard a space station orbiting the fictional planet Solaris. The scientific mission has stalled because the skeleton crew of three scientists have fallen into separate emotional crises. Psychologist Kris Kelvin travels to the Solaris space station to evaluate the situation only to encounter the same mysterious phenomena as the others. More

Andrej Rubljow (Flyer)
Iwans Kindheit (Flyer)

Iwans Kindheit

Andrei Tarkowski – 1962

The background of Andrei Tarkowski's first feature film is the Second World War, with the 12-year-old boy Iwan at the centre. As part of the official programme of films, it is still astonishing today how the Russian managed to shoot a film that stood across the system and showed the war from the perspective of a boy. Iwan seems totally hardened after losing his family and escaping a camp, he sees little prospects and quite simply wants to avenge the death of his loved ones. Tarkowski shows his masterly skills in cinematography in this early oeuvre. More

Die Walze und die Geige (Flyer)
Wenn die Kraniche ziehen (Flyer)

Wenn die Kraniche ziehen

Michail Kalatosow – 1957

Veronika and Boris come together in Moscow shortly before World War II. Walking along the river, they watch cranes fly overhead, and promise to rendezvous before Boris leaves to fight. Boris misses the meeting and is off to the front lines, while Veronika waits patiently, sending letters faithfully. After her house is bombed, Veronika moves in with Boris’ family, into the company of a cousin with his own intentions. More

Enthusiasm: The Symphony of Donbass

Dziga Wertow – 1930

Dziga Vertov's Enthusiasm (Symphony of the Donbass) is considered a masterpiece of early sound film and of Soviet avant-garde cinema. Dealing with the Five Year Plan of the late 1920s, it was praised by artists like Charlie Chaplin, was subsequently forgotten, and rediscovered by the avant-garde movement of the 1960s. More

Das Mädchen mit der Hutschachtel - Devuska s korobkoj (Flyer)

Das Mädchen mit der Hutschachtel - Devuska s korobkoj

Boris Barnet – 1927

Can you find happiness in the big city? The young hat maker Natascha, who lives with her grandfather in a suburb covered in winter snow, has to commute by train from the village to Moscow to deliver her creations to the extravagant Irene's hat shop. For the administration, Irene claims Natascha to be her subtenant in order to be able to have more living space. The clumsy railway official woos the lovely country girl with his ravishing smile. But she enters into a fictitious marriage with the provincial Ilya in order to get him a room in Moscow. More

Shinel - Der Mantel (Flyer)

Shinel - Der Mantel

Grigori Kosinzew Leonid Trauberg – 1926

A minor clerk, Bashmachkin, replaces his threadbare overcoat with one made from the finest materials he can afford. Then one evening ruffians beat him up and steal his cherished new garment. The actors’ highly stylized gestures border on modern dance, and Bashmachkin’s world, especially as he begins to lose his grasp on reality, is powerfully rendered with looming shadows, oblique camera angles and eccentric architecture. More

Mat - Die Mutter

Wsewolod Pudowkin – 1926

In this film, the mother of Pavel Vlasov is drawn into the revolutionary conflict when her husband and son find themselves on opposite sides during a worker's strike. After her husband dies during the failed strike, she betrays her son's ideology in order to try, in vain, to save his life. He is arrested, tried in what amounts to a judicial farce, and sentenced to heavy labor in a prison camp. During his incarceration, his mother aligns herself with him and his ideology and joins the revolutionaries. More

Ein Sechstel der Erde

Dziga Wertow – 1926

Dziga Wertow, who rejects the old "cinema drama" as literary coquetry, has for the first time clearly formulated the essence of film, which is detached from all other arts. In contrast to the feature film, which forces the camera to copy the human eye, one has to consider that the cinema eye sees differently and more precisely than the "unarmed eye". Wertow's downright mystical belief in the creative power of film language tolerates no obstacles, no walls of distance and boundaries of time. More

Bronenosec Potemkin - Panzerkreuzer Potemkin (Flyer)

Bronenosec Potemkin - Panzerkreuzer Potemkin

Sergej M. Eisenstein – 1925

The revolution film par excellence, here in the German needle-tone version of 1930: The film presents a dramatized version of the mutiny that occurred in 1905 when the crew of the Russian battleship Potemkin rebelled against their officers. Battleship Potemkin was named the greatest film of all time at the Brussels World's Fair in 1958. In 2012, the British Film Institute named it the eleventh greatest film of all time. More

Mr. West

Lew Kuleschow – 1924

Travelled to the Soviet Union with many prejudices, the American businessman Mr. West has to correct his view of the Soviets after several adventures at the end of his journey. Silent movie grotesque that ironically glosses the erroneous opinions of the West about the USSR. A film historical document worth seeing. (Dictionary of International Cinema) More